Windspeaker

Canada's National Aboriginal News Source

Self-termination policy proposed

Author: 
Jack D. Forbes, Guest Columnist, University of California, Davis
Volume: 
1
Issue: 
1
Year: 
2001

Many Native people have gotten so used to the idea of "blood quantum" (degree of "blood") that sometimes the origin of this racist concept is forgotten. Its use started in 1705 when the colony of Virginia adopted a series of laws that denied civil rights to any "negro, mulatto, or Indian" and which defined the above terms by stating that "the child of an Indian, and the child, grandchild, or great grandchild of a negro shall be deemed accounted, held, and taken to be a mulatto." Thus both a person of American race and a person of half-American race (a "half-blood" in other words) were treated as legally inferior persons.

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Self-termination policy proposed

Author: 
Jack D. Forbes, Guest Columnist, University of California, Davis
Volume: 
1
Issue: 
1
Year: 
2001

Many Native people have gotten so used to the idea of "blood quantum" (degree of "blood") that sometimes the origin of this racist concept is forgotten. Its use started in 1705 when the colony of Virginia adopted a series of laws that denied civil rights to any "negro, mulatto, or Indian" and which defined the above terms by stating that "the child of an Indian, and the child, grandchild, or great grandchild of a negro shall be deemed accounted, held, and taken to be a mulatto." Thus both a person of American race and a person of half-American race (a "half-blood" in other words) were treated as legally inferior persons.

Related Content

Who's in charge at INAC

Author: 
Windspeaker Staff
Volume: 
18
Issue: 
9
Year: 
2001

Page 4

An Indian Affairs minister who has been virtually invisible as far as the Native media goes since he was appointed 17 months ago, sat down for a "wide ranging interview" with the Canadian Press (CP) in mid-December to discuss what he sees as his new mandate to replace the Indian Act and change the way First Nations account for their financial actions.

In the weeks before that, Prime Minister Jean Chretien seemed to break the mold he established and maintained from his very first days in power of not commenting on Indian Affairs by saying he planned on addressing social justice issues in Indian Country. Political analysts say Chretien wants to tackle this issue to leave his mark on history, his legacy to rival his mentor Pierre Trudeau's repatriation of the Constitution or Brian Mulroney's NAFTA.

Related Content

Who's in charge at INAC

Author: 
Windspeaker Staff
Volume: 
18
Issue: 
9
Year: 
2001

Page 4

An Indian Affairs minister who has been virtually invisible as far as the Native media goes since he was appointed 17 months ago, sat down for a "wide ranging interview" with the Canadian Press (CP) in mid-December to discuss what he sees as his new mandate to replace the Indian Act and change the way First Nations account for their financial actions.

In the weeks before that, Prime Minister Jean Chretien seemed to break the mold he established and maintained from his very first days in power of not commenting on Indian Affairs by saying he planned on addressing social justice issues in Indian Country. Political analysts say Chretien wants to tackle this issue to leave his mark on history, his legacy to rival his mentor Pierre Trudeau's repatriation of the Constitution or Brian Mulroney's NAFTA.

Related Content

Debt forces band alliance with DFO

Author: 
Joan Taillon, Windspeaker Staff Writer, TOBIQUE, N.B.
Volume: 
1
Issue: 
0
Year: 
2001

An $8 million debt that is the legacy of two previous band administrations, accompanied by severe social problems and high unemployment, are the reasons Tobique First Nation's chief and four councillors went against the majority in a plebiscite, and signed a $7.5 million fishing agreement with the federal Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) on Nov. 22.

That's the view of councillor and vice-chief Ken (Scrappy) Perley when asked the reason some band members had issued a press release calling for the resignation of their chief, Patrick Francis, and the four councillors who signed with him.

The deal means that Tobique has to abide by DFO fishing regulations, which some members believe undermines their treaty rights. On the other hand it also gives them money to develop fishing capacity, which because Tobique is located 140 miles from the ocean, it did not have prior to signing.

Related Content

Debt forces band alliance with DFO

Author: 
Joan Taillon, Windspeaker Staff Writer, TOBIQUE, N.B.
Volume: 
1
Issue: 
0
Year: 
2001

An $8 million debt that is the legacy of two previous band administrations, accompanied by severe social problems and high unemployment, are the reasons Tobique First Nation's chief and four councillors went against the majority in a plebiscite, and signed a $7.5 million fishing agreement with the federal Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) on Nov. 22.

That's the view of councillor and vice-chief Ken (Scrappy) Perley when asked the reason some band members had issued a press release calling for the resignation of their chief, Patrick Francis, and the four councillors who signed with him.

The deal means that Tobique has to abide by DFO fishing regulations, which some members believe undermines their treaty rights. On the other hand it also gives them money to develop fishing capacity, which because Tobique is located 140 miles from the ocean, it did not have prior to signing.

Related Content

Treaty offers demonstrate wide gap in expectations

Author: 
David Wiwchar, Windspeaker Contributor, VANCOUVER
Volume: 
1
Issue: 
0
Year: 
2001

More than 220 chiefs, treaty negotiators, spectators and media members jammed into the Hyatt Regency's ballroom in downtown Vancouver on Dec. 11 to witness the formal Nuu-chah-nulth treaty offer exchange.

British Columbia's Minister of Aboriginal Affairs, David Zirnhelt, billed the government's offer as the largest in the province's treaty-making history, the event also marked the first time the province, First Nations and Canada have exchanged offers, rather than the province and Canada simply presenting their side of an offer.

Related Content

Treaty offers demonstrate wide gap in expectations

Author: 
David Wiwchar, Windspeaker Contributor, VANCOUVER
Volume: 
1
Issue: 
0
Year: 
2001

More than 220 chiefs, treaty negotiators, spectators and media members jammed into the Hyatt Regency's ballroom in downtown Vancouver on Dec. 11 to witness the formal Nuu-chah-nulth treaty offer exchange.

British Columbia's Minister of Aboriginal Affairs, David Zirnhelt, billed the government's offer as the largest in the province's treaty-making history, the event also marked the first time the province, First Nations and Canada have exchanged offers, rather than the province and Canada simply presenting their side of an offer.

Related Content

Canada apologizes for residential school system

Author: 
David Wiwchar, Windspeaker Contributor, PORT ALBERNI, B.C.
Volume: 
1
Issue: 
0
Year: 
2001

On a sunny Saturday afternoon, representatives from the federal government came to Nuu-chah-nulth territory to offer an apology from Canada for the horrors the Nuu-chah-nulth people experienced at government- and church-operated residential schools.

"If we expect to move forward as a nation, we have to address the issues related to the effects that the Indian residential schools had on the Nuu-chah-nulth peoples," said deputy minister of Indian Affairs, Shirley Serafini. "We are here today to show our sincere sorrow for the abuses suffered by Nuu-chah-nulth people who attended residential schools. This is not to affect legal responsibilities, which will continue to be dealt with separately."

Related Content

Canada apologizes for residential school system

Author: 
David Wiwchar, Windspeaker Contributor, PORT ALBERNI, B.C.
Volume: 
1
Issue: 
0
Year: 
2001

On a sunny Saturday afternoon, representatives from the federal government came to Nuu-chah-nulth territory to offer an apology from Canada for the horrors the Nuu-chah-nulth people experienced at government- and church-operated residential schools.

"If we expect to move forward as a nation, we have to address the issues related to the effects that the Indian residential schools had on the Nuu-chah-nulth peoples," said deputy minister of Indian Affairs, Shirley Serafini. "We are here today to show our sincere sorrow for the abuses suffered by Nuu-chah-nulth people who attended residential schools. This is not to affect legal responsibilities, which will continue to be dealt with separately."

Related Content

Take courageous steps, chief

Author: 
Paul Barnsley, Windspeaker Staff Writer, OTTAWA
Volume: 
18
Issue: 
9
Year: 
2001

Page 1

In what many observers believe is a signal that a power struggle for control of First Nations political leadership has begun, Matthew Coon Come, national chief of the Assembly of First Nations, told the chiefs on Dec. 13 that he is not willing to maintain the status quo.

The AFN has been haunted by questions about its effectiveness for years. Critics claim the national chief is forced to try and be all things to all chiefs in order to keep his position, providing little real leadership and even less representation for grassroots people.

Coon Come called for an end to this approach during his welcoming remarks to the chiefs who gathered in Ottawa for their three-day, year-end Confederacy of Nations meeting.

Related Content

Take courageous steps, chief

Author: 
Paul Barnsley, Windspeaker Staff Writer, OTTAWA
Volume: 
18
Issue: 
9
Year: 
2001

Page 1

In what many observers believe is a signal that a power struggle for control of First Nations political leadership has begun, Matthew Coon Come, national chief of the Assembly of First Nations, told the chiefs on Dec. 13 that he is not willing to maintain the status quo.

The AFN has been haunted by questions about its effectiveness for years. Critics claim the national chief is forced to try and be all things to all chiefs in order to keep his position, providing little real leadership and even less representation for grassroots people.

Coon Come called for an end to this approach during his welcoming remarks to the chiefs who gathered in Ottawa for their three-day, year-end Confederacy of Nations meeting.

Related Content

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